Side effects of sedating a horse

“Technically, veterinarians are not supposed to dispense a compounded drug if there is a commercially available product already, such as phenylbutazone [bute],” Moore says.“If your vet felt that there was a therapeutic use for a combination product of bute and vitamin E, then that is a legitimate reason for compounding it.Found in the medicine kits of many horse owners, bute can be prescribed for a plethora of ailments, including sole bruising, hoof abscesses, tendon strains, sprained ligaments and arthritic joints. “When used appropriately, they are very safe; however, some horse owners tend to give too much of a good thing.” Bute tends to be both economical and convenient, available in either injectable and oral formulations; but is most likely to cause problems if given too long or in improperly high doses, especially if horses are more sensitive to NSAID toxicity.“If you look at the chronic use of bute, there are certainly known ramifications from it,” Moore says.Phenylbutazone, or “bute,” is one of the most commonly administered prescription drugs in the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) family.

A different type of drug, flunixin meglumine (trade name Banamine), is found in the same NSAID family.

The list of tranquilisers, sedatives and supplements intended to calm a horse can be extensive, including some which can be purchased online or at tack shops.

For example, Acepromazine, known as “Ace,” is commonly used as a tranquilizer to keep a horse calm and relaxed by depressing the central nervous system.

In the past, traditional deworming programs didn’t consider each horse as an individual, as common practice was to deworm the entire barn on a fixed, regular schedule.

However, over the past 10 years, studies have shown there is a growing concern regarding parasite resistance to dewormers.

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