Non religious guy dating catholic girl

A marriage between a Catholic and another Christian is also considered a sacrament.

In fact, the church regards all marriages between baptized Christians as sacramental, as long as there are no impediments.

Theologican Robert Hater, author of the 2006 book, “When a Catholic Marries a Non-Catholic,” writes: “To regard mixed religion marriages negatively does them a disservice.

They are holy covenants and must be treated as such.” A marriage can be regarded at two levels – whether it is valid in the eyes of the church and whether it is a sacrament.

If children are raised in another faith, he notes, “the Catholic parent must show children good example, affirm the core beliefs of both parents’ religious traditions, make them aware of Catholic beliefs and practices and support the children in the faith they practice.” The Wedding Ceremony Because Catholics regard marriage as a sacred event, the church prefers that ecumenical interfaith couples marry in a Catholic church, preferably the Catholic party’s parish church.

If they wish to marry elsewhere, they must get permission from the local bishop. This permission is called a “dispensation from canonical form.” Without it, a wedding not held in a Catholic church is not considered valid.

“Their marriage is rooted in the Christian faith through their baptism,” Hater explains.

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a sacred event,” reported the USCCB’s Committee for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs, which discussed Catholic-Jewish marriages at a conference in November 2004.

Both depend in part on whether the non-Catholic spouse is a baptized Christian or a non-baptized person, such as a Jew, Muslim or atheist.

If the non-Catholic is a baptized Christian (not necessarily Catholic), the marriage is valid as long as the Catholic party obtains official permission from the diocese to enter into the marriage and follows all the stipulations for a Catholic wedding.

“On a wedding day, the fact that one-half of the congregation does not belong to the Catholic community [and, hence, does not receive Communion] cannot be a sign of welcome or unity on a couple’s wedding day.” It might be “likened to inviting guests to a celebration and not allowing them to eat,” he adds.

If an ecumenical couple wants to celebrate their wedding within Mass, they must get permission from the bishop, Hater says.

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